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Rhode Island will make history later this year when it opens the first state-approved safe injection site in the country. To get ready for this big moment, we spoke to Brandon del Pozo, who’s studied the effects of New York City’s safe injection sites.
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Boston Globe

What the drug reform movement missed

Camping on city streets, open-air drug use, and crime are generating fierce pushback against harm reduction efforts like decriminalization. It doesn’t have to be this way.
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News from SPH

The Road to Recovery

Dr. Francesca Beaudoin was the first physician in the nation to serve patients in a mobile drug recovery unit. The van, an innovative public health intervention on wheels, delivers services to individuals suffering from substance use disorder in Rhode Island’s underserved communities.
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News from SPH

Real-Time Health Communication

In the age of pandemics and misinformation, questions of how and when public health researchers should communicate their findings and influence public policy, grow in importance. One group at the School of Public Health has found new ways to translate public health research into action.
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Rhode Island's mobile methadone vans are the first of their type in the US. Dr. Francesca Beaudoin says they're an effective way to increase access to necessary medication, especially for those without housing or transportation.
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RHODE ISLAND PBS WEEKLY

Reducing Harm

As fatal overdoses reach a record high, Rhode Island becomes the first state in the country to legalize harm reduction centers, where people can use illicit drugs under the supervision of trained staff. Rhode Island PBS Weekly speaks to Brandon Marshall about how these centers work.
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News from SPH

Do No Harm

Brown is at the forefront of the future of public health, with researchers joining local partners to combine evidence, insight, and a commitment to impact to bring harm reduction tools to Rhode Island communities.
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The findings about the causes and characteristics of overdose deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic may be used to inform policies that could lower death rates even after COVID-19 is under control.
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A research team led by Brandon Marshall, an associate professor of epidemiology at Brown University's School of Public Health, found a 25 percent increase in fatal opioid overdoses after periods of freezing temperatures compared to days with an average temperature of 52 degrees. One possibility is that opioid use and exposure to cold weather could combine to create a negative biological effect, said William Goedel, a doctoral student at the School of Public Health, who spearheaded the analysis.
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As public health officials combat the opioid overdose epidemic, in part by reducing unnecessary prescribing, a study shows that drug manufacturers paid more than $46 million to more than 68,000 doctors over a 29-month period.
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