Ten on the 10s: Joseph Diaz M.D. '96, MPH '09

In celebration of Brown SPH’s 10th Anniversary, we’re featuring an alum on the 10th of each month who is advancing public health in Rhode Island.

Joseph Diaz M.D. '96, MPH '09 is associate professor of medicine and of medical science at Brown and serves the University’s Division of Biology and Medicine as associate dean for diversity and multicultural affairs. Dr. Diaz is co-director of the Concentration in Caring for Underserved Communities at the Warren Alpert Medical School and medical director of the Integra Community Care Network Accountable Entity. He also serves as the chief health equity officer for Care New England. Dr. Diaz focuses his research on disparities in the delivery of healthcare, particularly assessing and addressing cultural and linguistic barriers to cancer screening and preventive healthcare.

How does your your MPH training impact your work as a physician? As a University DEI leader?

My MPH training significantly broadened my impact as a physician. While my medical training largely focused on individual patients, the MPH better equipped me to address health disparities and promote health equity on a population level. It provided valuable frameworks for data analysis, allowing me to translate insights into actionable change. Additionally, the MPH program fostered lasting professional connections with colleagues who continue to be a source of collaboration.

“ While my medical training largely focused on individual patients, the MPH better equipped me to address health disparities and promote health equity on a population level. It provided valuable frameworks for data analysis, allowing me to translate insights into actionable change. ”

Joseph Diaz ‘96 M.D., ‘09 MPH

man teaches CPRWhat are your thoughts about the school at this important 10-year milestone?

Over the past decade, the School of Public Health has made a tremendous impact. By educating countless health professionals across Rhode Island, they've advanced the state's overall health.

What's your advice for aspiring public health professionals?

 Spend time listening to the needs and concerns of the communities you serve. This will help ensure your work is relevant and impactful. Public health is a collaborative effort so develop partnerships across agencies, non-profits, healthcare providers, and other sectors to achieve shared goals.